Native American Resources

General Resources

http://www.narf.org/New Window
Founded in 1970, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is the oldest and largest nonprofit law firm dedicated to asserting and defending the rights of Indian tribes, organizations and individuals nationwide. NARF's practice is concentrated in five key areas: the preservation of tribal existence; the protection of tribal natural resources; the promotion of Native American human rights; the accountability of governments to Native Americans; and the development of Indian law and educating the public about Indian rights, laws, and issues.

http://www.bia.gov/New Window
The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) responsibility is the administration and management of 55.7 million acres of land held in trust by the United States for American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives. There are 561 federal recognized tribal governments in the United States. Developing forestlands, leasing assets on these lands, directing agricultural programs, protecting water and land rights, developing and maintaining infrastructure and economic development are all part of the agency's responsibility. In addition, the Bureau of Indian Affairs provides education services to approximately 48,000 Indian students.

http://www.nativeweb.org/New Window
Resources for Indigenous Peoples of the World.

http://www.csusm.edu/nadp/nadp.aspxNew Window
This site includes a number of indexes and explanatory articles as well as a search engine. The explanatory articles concerning allotment and the Rogue River War and Siletz Reservation provide tours of the main topics represented in the documents with links to indexes. The site includes topical indexes for the Siletz documents and the 1871 published reports, and an index of reservations listed in the allotment tables. Perhaps the most useful finding aid is the chronological index of documents in the Rogue River War and Siletz Reservation collection. It allows a researcher to follow particular developments through the documents.

http://indiancountry.com/New Window
The Nation's Leading Native American news source.

http://www.kindredtrails.com/native.htmlNew Window
A Native American genealogy website where you can find your ancestors.

Back to the top of the page.

Spiritual Resources

http://www.csp.org/communities/native_american.htmlNew Window
The links on this page are provided to help address the many questions we get regarding Native American Spirituality. CSP is not a Native American Church community nor do we have direct contact information for NAC groups.

http://religiousmovements.lib.virginia.edu/nrms/naspirit.aspxlNew Window
The diversity of American Indian tribes precludes a comprehensive examination of their religions and their belief systems. Anthropologists have compiled a huge trove of information detailing practices and beliefs of many different groups; this information remains isolated from popular culture. While there is a proliferation of popularized versions of Native American spirituality, these are often not the products of the tribes or their members. The beliefs and practices of many groups are sectarian derivatives of other native groups, and there is also a significant infusion of Christianity, and more recently, New Age beliefs and practices permeating these traditional beliefs.

Back to the top of the page.

Business Resources

http://www.aises.org/New Window
The AISES mission is to increase substantially the representation of American Indian and Alaskan Natives in engineering, science and other related technology disciplines. AISES is a charitable non-profit organization with members who pay yearly dues or one-time Sequoyah donations.

http://www.naja.com/New Window
The Native American Journalists Association serves and empowers Native journalists through programs and actions designed to enrich journalism and promote Native cultures. NAJA recognizes Native Americans as distinct peoples based on tradition and culture. In this spirit, NAJA educates and unifies its membership through journalism programs that promote diversity and defends challenges to free press, speech and expression. NAJA is committed to increase the representation of Native journalists in mainstream media. NAJA encourages both mainstream and tribal media to attain the highest standards of professionalism, ethics and responsibility.

Back to the top of the page.

Cultural Resources

http://www.dream-catchers.org/New Window
DreamCatchers Incorporated is a non-profit, charitable organization founded by the officers of Kitaru Productions to promote cross cultural communications emphasizing environmental respect, social justice and civic engagement. The organization's work is rooted in the belief that within the spiritual traditions of the ancient cultures of the Americas, lie values not only viable in today's world, but absolutely vital to the regeneration of Earth's life cycle. In cooperation with other culturally based organizations, DreamCatchers fosters the creation of documentaries, feature films, educational events, school curricula and other media based pieces which inspire, motivate and teach values of respect for nature and people by disseminating information about issues such as health care, the environment, immigration, civil rights and other topics to promote civic engagement.

http://www.deneculture.org/New Window
The Yamózha Kúé Society, also referred to as the Dene Cultural Institute, has been working to assist Dene to maintain and strengthen our distinct culture since 1987. It has concentrated on coordinating research and educational activities that protect and promote Dene culture, languages, spirituality, heritage, tradition and customs. It has also facilitated efforts by communities to preserve our culture.

http://www.iaia.edu/New Window
The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is located in one of the most diverse concentrations of Native peoples in North America, in the heart of the nation's oldest multi-cultural communities and in one of the largest art markets in the country. The City of Santa Fe's population is 63,203. The elevation is approximately 6,990. Situated on 140 acres of land 12 miles southwest of downtown Santa Fe, the IAIA campus environment supports natural plant and wildlife. In each direction, one has breathtaking views of the landscape. To the west are the Jemez Mountains; to the northeast are the Sangre de Christos Mountains, and to the south are the Ortiz Mountains with the Sandia Mountain Range looming behind them.

http://www.artnatam.com/New Window
Only Native American Artists are presented at this site. This is a juried collectionNew Window of works. The variety and quality of artists' work speaks for itself. Please feel welcome and enjoy yourself!

http://library.rit.edu/guides/liberal-arts/native-american-writers-and-their-writings-selected-bibliography.htmlNew Window
Selected Bibliography on Native American Writers and Their Writings

http://www.nativebooks.com/New Window
Native Indian Books. The World's Largest Collection of Native North American Books. Over 5000 Titles

Back to the top of the page.

Educational Resources

http://www.cwis.org/index.phpNew Window
The Center for World Indigenous Studies is a non profit 501c (3) research and education organization. The site aims to provide access to indigenous peoples knowledge and ideas, conflict resolution based on mutual consent, protecting the rights of indigenous peoples. There is a news and research area, an "e-zine" or daily journal, a media center, an art gallery, and a virtual library.

http://www.collegefund.org/- In the wake of the civil rights and American Indian self-determination movements of the 1960s, tribal leaders realized they would have to take control of the direction of education in order to reverse centuries of misguided and failed federal education policies. In 1968, the Navajo Nation created a first-of-its-kind educational institution - a college controlled by the tribe, located on the reservation and established specifically to provide higher education to tribal members. With that monumental event, the tribal college movement was born. Since then, the number of tribal colleges and universities has grown to 32, located in 11 states and serving more than 250 American Indian Nations from every geographic region in the United States.

http://www.aihec.org/New Window
American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) was founded in 1972 by the presidents of the nation's first six Tribal Colleges, as an informal collaboration among member colleges. Today, AIHEC has grown to represent 34 colleges in the United States and one Canadian institution. Unlike most professional associations, it is governed jointly by each member institution. AIHEC's mission is to support the work of these colleges and the national movement for tribal self-determination. Its mission statement, adopted in 1973, identifies four objectives: maintain commonly held standards of quality in American Indian education; support the development of new tribally controlled colleges; promote and assist in the development of legislation to support American Indian higher education; and encourage greater participation by American Indians in the development of higher education policy.

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oese/oie/index.htmlNew Window
A US Department of Education site.

http://www.necvancouver.org/New Window
The Native Education Centre and Urban Native Indian Education Society provide both a culturally appropriate and supportive learning environment for Aboriginal learners, within available resources.

Back to the top of the page.

Health Resources

http://www.nativeshop.org/ New Window
Native Shop is a project of the Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center. We are marketing products as an economic development project to raise funds for the resource center's programs. In 1985, a group of Native Americans living on or near the Yankton Sioux Reservation in South Dakota formed the Native American Community Board (NACB) to address pertinent issues of health, education, land and water rights, and economic development of Native American people.

Back to the top of the page.


Last Updated: 2/21/13