Faculty Evaluation/P&T Guidelines

(Referred to as "Standards Document")


OFFICE OF RECORD: Office of the President
ISSUED BY: President
EFFECTIVE DATE: 08/25/94 (Revised 12/18/12)
APPROVED BY:  David B. Borofsky, Pres                              02-45-00

02-45-00

Dakota State University Mission

In 1984, the South Dakota State Legislature identified a radical, new mission for DSU, mandating the integration of technology across the entire curriculum. The mission-change years turned what had been a small, locally focused Normal School into a high-tech institution that prides itself on innovation while ensuring a quality educational experience. Dakota State University is mission-driven -- focused on fully integrating new computer technology into all academic programs.

Our state-mandated mission (see Attachment A) is to specialize in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in computer management, computer information systems, and other related fields, with a special emphasis on the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers who have expertise in the use of computer technology and information processing in the teaching and learning process. Dakota State University also offers degrees in Sioux Falls at University Center, a joint-use facility whose operation is shared between DSU, USD and SDSU, at Rapid City Regional Hospital, and via the Internet.

We view our campus as a safe, friendly, open, cooperative and collaborative environment. We see ourselves as flexible, adaptable and accountable. We are proud of our graduates and the high placement levels they achieve. We have a quality and caring faculty and staff who are student-focused. These are primary characteristics of the institution that we want to carry forward into our future.


DSU's Strategic Initiatives for 2007-2014

The university sets aside time to look at its accomplishments and plan for the future every five years. The current strategic plan’ cycle, however, has been expanded from 2012 until 2014. This decision was taken to accommodate the resignation of our former president, the search for a new leader, and to ensure that the new president will be a part of the new strategic planning process. The 2007-2014 strategic plan includes seven strategic initiatives that will drive the decision-making of the campus throughout 2007-2014.

Strategic Focus #1: Expanding Information Technology Leadership

Outcome #1: By 2014, DSU will have three new cutting-edge graduate programs and five new cutting-edge undergraduate degree programs that reflect the institution’s strong focus on its information-technology mission.

Strategic Focus #2: Optimizing and Sustaining On-campus Enrollment

Outcome #2: By 2014, DSU will attain an optimal on-campus enrollment of 1,400 undergraduate students.

Strategic Focus #3: Increasing Student Retention and Graduation Rates by Providing an Exceptional Student Experience

Outcome #3: By 2014, the first-year retention and six-year completion rates of first-time, full-time baccalaureate degree-seeking students will increase by 5% over the last 5-year average.

Strategic Focus #4: Advancing Applied Research

Outcome #4: By 2014, DSU will increase its research activity by doubling the number of awarded grants/contracts and increasing the value of these grants/contracts to $5 million.

Strategic Focus #5: Extending Educational Outreach

Outcome #5: By 2014, DSU will increase self-support credit hour generation by 50%.

Strategic Focus #6: Promoting National and International Visibility

Outcome #6: By 2014, DSU will achieve one nationally competitive award for academic excellence or innovation.

Strategic Focus #7: Developing New Sources of Revenue.

Outcome #7: By 2014, the DSU Foundation net assets will reach $10 million, the annual phonathon will reach $150,000 in pledges, and the University will have new resources in place to support new academic programs and initiatives.


Faculty Roles Relative to DSU's
Institutional Mission and Strategic Initiatives

Dakota State University strives for excellence through accomplishment of its mission and strategic initiatives and the institution’s faculty contribute to the university’s success through their specific assignments and accomplishments. The University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment Section 10.1 - 2 indicates that all faculty holding professorial rank (unless otherwise specified in a faculty member’s contract) must be significantly active in the broad areas of teaching and advising; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service. A faculty member whose primary responsibility is teaching is expected to undertake an effort equivalent to that needed to deliver 30 credit hours of undergraduate instruction per academic year. However, professorial faculty are also assigned reasonable time to support active research, scholarship or creative artistic activity and professional service obligations – generally the equivalent of 6 credit hours of undergraduate instruction. A faculty member whose primary responsibility is research is expected to undertake the effort needed to maintain a research program recognized nationally for its excellence.

This document is intended to define, for the faculty, the university’s qualitative and quantitative expectations for faculty. The standards provided here take into consideration the university’s mission, the faculty member’s discipline and the faculty member’s rank and role within the university. To identify and reward professional achievement and excellence among the faculty, the university and its faculty together have developed the broad definitions of professional achievement included in this document. Further, these broad statements of professional achievement are intended to:

  • Bring into focus the institutional mission;
  • Clarify faculty roles relative to the institutional mission;
  • Improve the dialogue between faculty members and the university administration;
  • Facilitate professional development plans and activities for faculty;
  • Clarify faculty development needs;
  • Improve the process for faculty evaluation;
  • Improve decision-making processes relative to faculty promotion, tenure, salary, and appointment to senior/advanced positions;
  • Enhance opportunities for faculty recognition and reward; and
  • Demonstrate accountability to the public.

Clarifying and understanding the university’s expectations relative to teaching and advising, scholarship, research and creative activity and service are a necessary first step in identifying and rewarding the professional behavior of faculty. As a consequence, the professional behaviors identified here are intended to help faculty understand the university’s expectations. These professional behaviors are used to determine the faculty member’s annual performance ratings and eligibility for a continuing contract. They are also used to determine the faculty member’s eligibility for promotion and tenure and other university decisions that are naturally linked to faculty performance, such as appointment to the graduate faculty or other, similar recognitions.

Civility in working with colleagues, staff members, students and others:

Faculty members are responsible for discharging their instructional, scholarly and service duties civilly, constructively and in an informed manner. They must treat their colleagues, staff, students and visitors with respect, and they must comport themselves at all times, even when expressing disagreement or when engaging in pedagogical exercises, in ways that will preserve and strengthen the willingness to cooperate and to give or to accept instruction, guidance or assistance. (See BOR Policy 4:38)


Teaching and Advising

Teaching: A fundamental mission of any university is to provide opportunities for learning and academic achievement. In their teaching roles, Professorial and Lecturer rank faculty members are expected to initiate, develop and evaluate educational programs, courses and related materials; to develop new ways of conveying knowledge, to share knowledge, and to train others; and to integrate new knowledge and research into the learning experiences. At DSU, all faculty members are also expected to demonstrate professional skills in the use of technology appropriate to their discipline. These aspects of teaching are critical to professional achievement:

  • Content Expertise – defined as knowledge, skills and abilities in an academic discipline;
  • Instructional Design – defined as skills in designing, sequencing and presenting content; skills in evaluation and assessment of student performance;
  • Instructional Delivery – defined as the human interactive skills that promote learning;
  • Course Management – defined as the organizational and bureaucratic skills needed to manage and operate a course;
  • Instructional Technology – defined as the use of appropriate technology by both the faculty member and by the students in the classroom and in content delivery;
  • Advising – defined as consulting with students to provide guidance relative to classroom performance, academic planning and scheduling, career goals and decisions.

To meet expectations in teaching, Professorial and Lecturer rank faculty members must demonstrate professional achievement in teaching undergraduate and/or graduate courses and in the evaluation of student performance. Therefore, all faculty are expected to accomplish these routine behaviors. For annual evaluation, there is no documentation required for these items, but failure to satisfactorily perform these tasks would result in an evaluation of not meeting standards.

  • Provide an appropriate syllabus following the DSU Course Syllabus Outline which meets institutional, college and discipline guidelines; the DSU Course Syllabus Outline is located in the Faculty/Staff Handbook.
  • Align course content to meet curricular guidelines and standards;
  • Use required technology (TabletPC, specialty lab, approved software, etc.) and course management systems;
  • Provide timely feedback on assignments, projects, and exams, based on expectations outlined in the DSU Course Syllabus Outline; communication and grading/feedback response times should be clearly stated on the syllabus;
  • Be available to students (online, by phone, and/or during office hours) according to the current Campus Workload Policy 02-46-00;
  • Submit accurate midterm and final grades by required deadlines;
  • Give students an opportunity to complete a course evaluation;
  • Adhere to established college, university and BOR policies and procedures.

In order to meet expectations for Basic Performance in teaching and advising, the faculty member must accomplish the routine behaviors listed above and meet expectations for Basic Performance in teaching and Basic Performance in advising. In order to meet expectations for High Performance in teaching and advising, the faculty member must meet expectations for both High Performance in teaching and High Performance in advising. It is the faculty member’s responsibility to fully describe the impact, benefit and effort expended in their teaching activities.

Teaching -- Basic Performance:The faculty member must demonstrate and document all of the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for Basic Performance in Teaching:

  • Adhere to the course objectives, content, activities, etc. presented on the course syllabi;
  • Demonstrate appropriate teaching competence in content area;
  • Use technological resources in courses;
  • Meet expectations for Basic Performance in Advising.

To exceed expectations for Basic Performance in Teaching, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors in teaching. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Develop and use appropriate instructional materials to meet course program objectives;
  • Engage in self-assessment of instruction and teaching materials;
  • Offer challenging and current courses that afford students opportunities to learn the information, methods of inquiry, and professional skills identified in the descriptions and relevant departmental or program mission statements;
  • Interpret and present technical information in a way the learners (public, students, other clientele) will understand;
  • Provide supplementary learning resources in a timely and organized manner;
  • Review and revise program material including textbooks, syllabi, evaluation instruments;
  • Provide for individualized instruction through courses or activities when appropriate;
  • Promote student-to-student, student-to-faculty, and small-group interaction;
  • Support university-wide program assessment;
  • Contribute to program development and/or review processes;
  • Collaborate with colleagues to improve teaching/learning;
  • Sponsor field trips, outside resource instructors and research projects, if appropriate and consistent with available resources;
  • Take classes or seminars and/or attend conferences and faculty development opportunities relevant to the teaching discipline;
  • Use technology-based instructional methods to aid student learning.

Teaching -- High Performance:High Performance presumes the faculty member has accomplished the routine behaviors listed above in the section on Basic Performance and that the faculty member’s professional behavior has moved beyond this level. High Performance in Teaching may be demonstrated through attitudes and activities that convey an excitement for the course material and inspire learners to continue and excel. It may be exceptional clarity and delivery of the content or the use of innovative classroom methods that challenge the students to question, to take risks, to push themselves intellectually, and to go beyond the requirements. It may include the exceptional ability to relate abstract ideas to everyday life or actively involve students in the learning process and to demonstrate the process of learning.

Participation in faculty development efforts and the application of knowledge gained from these activities reflect a commitment to excellence by the individual. As examples, faculty development may include participation or presentation of workshops or courses in writing across the curriculum, accelerated learning techniques, student learning styles, teaching innovation, cultural diversity, strategies to improve the teaching of nontraditional students, or the use of modern technology/telecommunications. It might be auditing other faculty members' classes to observe and learn teaching techniques, and many other similar activities.

Teaching excellence also requires the presentation or sharing of information with other faculty members with a goal toward improved teaching. Excellence may also include sharing with colleagues, both internal and external to the University, information attesting to the University's excellence in teaching. This may take the form of reports, presentations, or exhibits. Excellent teachers, who strive to improve, try new techniques, evaluate and share successful innovations, enhance the reputation of the University.

High Performance in teaching may be thought of as efforts to enrich the learning experience and the quality of teaching. It is an improvement in the quality of the work already provided at Basic Performance. Some activities in this list differ from Basic Performance activities only by inclusion of the relative term “significant”. In this context, “significant” should be interpreted as describing activities which are exceptional in terms of scope, prestige of venue, impact on the audience / profession, importance to the university, etc., rather than on routine elements.

In addition to accomplishing the routine behaviors listed above and the professional behaviors for Basic Performance in teaching, the faculty member must demonstrate and document all of the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for High Performance in Teaching:

  • Demonstrate teaching mastery in content area;
  • Guide, inspire and challenge learners to push themselves intellectually;
  • Use primary or scientifically based sources of information associated with a discipline or area of study to create opportunities to learn;
  • Apply theories and techniques from faculty development activities;
  • Evaluate teaching techniques with a variety of methods;
  • Meet expectations for High Performance in Advising.

To exceed expectations for High Performance in Teaching, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors. It is the faculty member’s responsibility to fully describe the impact, benefit and effort expended in their teaching activities. The documentation requirements for this section are more significant than the other teaching areas. The faculty member must provide, in two pages or less, narrative of current teaching methods, strengths, problems/challenges, goals, and other material in a manner that will present a context for evaluating teaching performance. The documentation should reflect and explain the impact of teaching during the current evaluation period. See the section “Documenting Professional Behavior in Teaching” in Appendix B “Documentation for Promotion and Tenure” for additional recommendations.

The following professional behaviors are not intended to be all-inclusive; but to serve as examples to be addressed in the narrative:

  • Require students to use advanced technological resources;
  • Create an environment for questioning and risk taking;
  • Encourage and guide students to achieve career relevant, and experiential learning outcomes;
  • Demonstrate exceptional skill in dissemination and delivery;
Conceive, explore, develop, implement, evaluate and refine creative, innovative instructional methods, techniques, and materials;
  • Foster independent learning, creative thinking and exploration of ideas;
  • Develop conceptual connections between fields, ideas, values;
  • Seek collaborative relationships in teaching;
  • Model excellence in scholarship and learning;
  • Attract students to courses by maintaining standards of excellence;
  • Be sought by and serve as a mentor for students and other faculty;
  • Involve colleagues in improving one’s own teaching methods;
  • Guide and evaluate student research or capstone experiences;
  • Develop and communicate new understanding and insights;
  • Develop and use instructional materials to meet degree program objectives;
  • Receive fellowships for teaching activities;
  • Use peer evaluations to evaluate teaching techniques.

Advising: The faculty member’s role as advisor is critical and essential, not only to advise students with regard to university requirements but also to assist students in identifying and developing skills and knowledge in their chosen professional field. In that respect, Professorial and Lecturer rank faculty members also serve as mentors to the students assigned to them through a formal advisor / advisee relationship and to the students in their classes or majoring in their discipline.

Academic advising includes both the formal and informal guidance provided to students to help them investigate, identify and accomplish academic and career goals. To meet expectations in advising, all faculty members must demonstrate professional achievement in both formal and informal advising. These aspects of advising are critical to professional achievement:

  • Formal advising – defined as providing sensitive, knowledgeable and skilled guidance to enhance the relationship between the student and the university and to help the student achieve his/her academic goals;
  • Informal advising – defined as providing sensitive, considerate and caring guidance to enhance the student’s experiences at the university and to help the student achieve his/her personal goals.

To meet expectations for Basic Performance in Teaching and Advising, the faculty member must meet expectations for Basic Performance in Teaching and Basic Performance in Advising. To meet expectations for High Performance in Teaching and Advising, the faculty member must meet expectations for both High Performance in Teaching and High Performance in Advising. See the section “Documenting Professional Behavior in Advising” in Appendix B “Documentation for Promotion and Tenure” for additional recommendations. It is the faculty member’s responsibility to fully describe the impact, benefit and effort expended in their advising activities.

Advising -- Basic Performance:The faculty member must demonstrate and document all of the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for Basic Performance in Advising. For annual evaluation, there is no documentation required for these items, but failure to satisfactorily perform these tasks would result in an evaluation of not meeting standards.

  • Be available to students on a regular basis;
  • Maintain advisee records and track their progress;
  • Process all university forms related to advising in a timely fashion;
  • Use campus provided software tools (e.g.WebAdvisor, Colleague, etc.)in advising;
  • Proactively work with students to clarify graduation and major requirements;
  • Adhere to established college, university and BOR policies and procedures.

To exceed expectations for Basic Performance in Advising, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Help students transition into the university (e.g., registration, meet with incoming students and their families);
  • Inform students of university policies and procedures;
  • Assist students in locating available resources;
  • Guide students in the selection of classes to meet academic requirements;
  • Communicate basic career guidance to students;
  • Help students understand the role of general education and foundation courses in the degree program;
  • Provide students with recommendations for scholarships and job placement.

Advising -- High Performance: High Performance presumes the faculty member has demonstrated characteristics listed under Basic Performance and that performance moves beyond this level. Some activities in this list differ from Basic Performance activities only by inclusion of the relative term “significant”. In this context, “significant” should be interpreted as describing activities which are exceptional in terms of scope, prestige of venue, impact on the audience / profession, importance to the university, etc.

In addition to accomplishing the professional behaviors indicated above in Basic Performance in Advising, the faculty member must demonstrate and document all the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for High Performance in Advising.

  • Provide significant assistance to aid students as they transition into the university (e.g., registration, meet with incoming students and their families);
  • Develop and make readily available information to assist advisees (e.g., checklists, mailing/distribution lists).

To exceed expectations for High Performance in Advising, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Initiate opportunities for interaction with students;
  • Encourage students to seek out university resources, policies and procedures to enable them to deal with situations before they become problems;
  • Recognize and adapt advising techniques for students with diverse needs;
  • Assist students in developing study skills and other techniques to improve their academic performance;
  • Help students assess their skills and interests to help them obtain their personal and career goals;
  • Be recognized as an outstanding advisor;
  • Provide training to other advisors;
  • Develop advising strategies to improve student retention;
  • Be sought by graduate students as thesis/dissertation advisor and undergraduate students as capstone experience advisor;
  • Assist with the GS 100 University Experience or equivalent;
  • Seek out opportunities to enhance advising skills;
  • Assist with at-risk advising or the Early Alert Program.

Scholarship, Research and Creative Activities

This section only applies to faculty holding professorial rank. Scholarship, research and creative activities, prerequisites for competent and current teaching, contribute to the expansion of knowledge and the development of the arts, and enhance the service provided to the public. The university expects that faculty make a serious commitment to scholarship, research and creative activities.

Scholarship, research and creative activities may take a variety of forms (a list of acceptable formats is suggested within this document) but, such activities cannot be solely for the classroom. Faculty members must continue to learn in his/her discipline through appropriate scholarship, research, creative activities and to participate in the discipline’s professional deliberations. Indeed, scholarship, research and creative activities should result in new knowledge in a discipline, ideally in the form of peer-reviewed scholarship/creative activities and artifacts in recognized venues. In summary, scholarship, research and creative activities must involve the presentation of one’s ideas and works to one’s professional peers or the learned public for debate and judgment and, at a minimum, this presentation of ideas must include a proposal or invitation to present to a learned audience outside the university.

Dakota State University recognizes scholarship to include both basic and applied research, as well as other forms of scholarship and creative activity. These aspects of scholarship, research and creative activity are critical to professional achievement:

  • Development of knowledge within the professional community – defined as sustained inquiry in the academic discipline, with productivity in the areas of publication, presentation, exhibition and/or performance;
  • Development of professional skills and standing within the professional community – defined as recognition among peers and others for expertise in the academic discipline.

There are numerous reputable venues for scholarly manuscript and creative works publication, including fee for publication, online, conference proceedings and traditional formats. The recognition and importance of the different forms and presentations of scholarship will vary depending upon the role of a discipline and the individual faculty member's assignment. It is the faculty member’s responsibility to fully describe the impact, benefit and effort expended in their scholarship, research and creative activities.

Impact may be demonstrated by the following (non-inclusive):

For Scholarly Work

  • Journal/conference acceptance rate
  • Journal impact factor (eigenfactor, number of subscribers; etc.)
  • Nature of manuscript review process (peer, editorial, technical, etc.; double-blind or single-blind peer review; number of reviewers; level of scholarly discourse between author, editor/reviewers, and editorial boards)
  • Frequency with which work has been cited in other works.

For Creative Work

  • Include web link, program, flyer etc. detailing the event or performance / creative work (publication, performance event, exhibit, etc.), prestige of venue, sponsorship, viewership (virtual or in person) and other criteria that help to indicate the impact of the work.
  • Juried show details, including: acceptance rate for juried show, nature of the jury process, bios of jurors etc.
  • Details of the event (virtual or otherwise), including: prestige of venue, number who attended event, and number who viewed exhibit, including number of hits (daily/monthly/yearly) for online viewings etc.
  • Awards and Honors received
  • Peer Review, PR and Press Coverage: provide web links or articles of reviews and discussions of the creative work and/or event

A list of tools for identifying impact factor, acceptance rate, etc. may be found on the Mundt Library’s website in the “Toolbox for annual evaluations and promotion and tenure” tab at http://dsu.libguides.com/faculty. Complete citations for all scholarly manuscripts must be provided, including URL or other on-line location.  

Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity – Basic Performance:To ensure competency and currency, faculty must be engaged in behaviors which exhibit sustained inquiry in their academic discipline. These activities may be demonstrated, for example, by maintaining currency in the literature of one’s discipline, sustained participation in professional organizations, and/or a continuing series of research and publication.

The faculty member must demonstrate and document all of the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for Basic Performance in Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity:
  • Demonstrate sustained inquiry in their academic discipline;
  • Demonstrate scholarly productivity;
  • Adhere to established college, university and BOR policies and procedures.

To exceed expectations for Basic Performance in Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Demonstrate willingness to share expertise with university community;
  • Participate in professional meetings, conventions, symposiums, and conferences and share that knowledge with the campus community;
  • Publish / present non-peer reviewed research at professional meetings, conventions, symposiums, and conferences;
  • Write for discipline-related periodicals or bulletins;
  • Serve as a book reviewer;
  • Demonstrate creative application of new technologies within the academic discipline;
  • Deliver artistic performance of established artistic works;
  • Exhibit an accumulated body of artistic works in a non-juried show;
  • Use research to develop new teaching methods, library or other learning tools / services / resources;
  • Publish work related to innovative pedagogy and technology in a significant venue;
  • Deliver presentations or papers on pedagogy-related topics;
  • Experiment with instructional methods and techniques using one’s own research;
  • Guide and evaluate student research projects and/or theses;
  • Supervise student research which results in presentations;
  • Submit proposals for / receive / conduct research specified in grants;
  • Submit design work in graphic / marketing competitions.

Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity – High Performance:High Performance presumes the faculty member has demonstrated characteristics listed under Basic Performance and that the faculty member’s professional behavior has moved beyond this level. Some activities in this list differ from Basic Performance activities only by inclusion of the relative term “significant”. In this context, “significant” should be interpreted as describing activities which are exceptional in terms of scope, prestige of venue, impact on the audience / profession, importance to the university, etc.

In addition to accomplishing the professional behaviors indicated above in Basic Performance in Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity, the faculty member must demonstrate and document all the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for High Performance in Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity:

  • Demonstrate significant and sustained inquiry in their academic discipline;
  • Demonstrate significant and sustained scholarly productivity.

To exceed expectations for High Performance in Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Publish academic research, poems, novels, plays, musical compositions, and/or works of art in significant / peer reviewed publications;
  • Present at peer-reviewed or significant professional meetings, conventions, symposiums, and conferences;
  • Deliver invited lectures and/or speeches for other universities, professional meetings, conventions and/or conferences;
  • Serve as peer reviewer for professional meetings, conventions, symposiums, and conferences;
  • Serve as an editor / peer reviewer of papers for publication;
  • Write chapter(s) for discipline-related books;
  • Develop new software, inventions and/or patents;
  • Receive recognition as an expert in one’s academic field;
  • Deliver performances of original artistic works;
  • Exhibit original artistic works in juried shows;
  • Exhibit an accumulated body of original artistic works;
  • Provide consulting or creative services pertaining to one’s discipline;
  • Supervise independent student research which results in publication or presentation to professional / learned audience;
  • Submit proposals / receive / conduct research specified in significant grants;
  • Receive fellowship for research or artistic activity.

Service

Dakota State University has defined service as the donation of time, effort and energy, without significant compensation, to activities that draw upon the faculty member's professional expertise and knowledge. Significant compensation is defined as more than $600. Activities that are performed as part of contracted administrative duties such as program coordinator, assessment coordinator, paid club advisor, etc. cannot be listed as service to the University. 

At Dakota State University, all faculty members are expected to perform the routine behaviors for Service as outlined below. Documentation for these behaviors is not required. However, not performing any of these behaviors would result in an evaluation of not meeting expectations.

  • Provide requested documents to assist in program reviews;
  • Provide requested documents to assist in accreditation of programs or the university;
  • Provide requested documents to committees necessary to discharge committee duties.

Although providing requested documents is a requirement, those making the requests must provide a reasonable amount of time for faculty to perform the request.

Faculty unit members who hold lecturer or librarian rank are not subject to shared governance expectations, although they may be directed to assist the professorate informally in matters related to curriculum and course delivery. Faculty who hold lecturer rank and who are assigned service obligations are eligible for three credits of workload release. Faculty in this category will be expected to meet performance standards relevant to their assignment.

Service is an integral facet of the profession and all faculty unit members who hold professorial rank are expected to participate in the academic governance of their universities, to contribute to the work of departmental committees or task forces, and to participate in searches for new members for the department. Professorial faculty over a 6-year period (prior to tenure) must show some involvement in all 3 areas—not necessarily in every annual review, but over the course of time.

There are three aspects to service:

  • Service to the university – defined as active participation in academic and university functions and activities, committees, and other governance structures;
  • Service to the discipline or profession – defined as active participation in professional organizations and their activities;
  • Service to the community or public – defined as activities that benefit community organizations such as K-12 school districts and organizations, corporations and agencies other than the university.

Service expectations align with board policy 4:38: “A variety of activities are classified as service. The needs of the institution and the expertise of faculty unit members may require that faculty unit members concentrate efforts in certain service areas to the exclusion of activity in other service areas. The recognition and importance of the different forms of service will vary depending upon the mission of the university, the role of a discipline within the university's functions and the individual faculty unit member's assignment. Thus, although service includes the following and similar activities, not all of these need be recognized or judged to be important or sufficient for each faculty unit member.” See the section “Documenting Professional Behavior in Service” in Appendix B “Documentation for Promotion and Tenure” for additional recommendations. It is the faculty member’s responsibility to fully describe the impact, benefit and effort expended in their service activities.

Service - Meets Expectations

To meet service expectations, the faculty member must demonstrate and document the professional behaviors listed below:

Service to the university:

  • Participate in academic/campus committees;
  • Participate in program/university assessment, evaluation or accreditation;
  • Participate in student recruitment, registration, and retention activities;
  • Participate in activities which support the university’s strategic initiatives;
  • Adhere to established college, university and BOR policies and procedures.

Service expectations may also be met through the following activities. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Share professional expertise and/or materials with the university community;
  • Participate in the development of university’s academic programs, curriculum and/or program modification, assessment plans, learning, or support services;
  • Participate in faculty, college or university governance;
  • Participate in institutional projects/studies;
  • Share expertise in technology with other faculty members.

In addition, activities which provide service to the discipline and the community may be used to meet service expectations, such as the following examples:

  • Participate in professional organizations and associated activities;
  • Share professional expertise with the community or public.

Citizenship activities by themselves are not sufficient to meet service expectations but may also be included in the annual evaluation documentation provided by faculty members. Faculty members are encouraged to provide these types of nonprofessional behaviors:

  • Participate in local, state, and/or national civic activities that promote a positive relationship between the university and the community;

Service - Exceeds Expectations

To exceed service expectations, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors. Some activities may exceed expectations only by inclusion of the relative term “significant”. In this context, “significant” should be interpreted as describing activities which are exceptional in terms of scope, prestige of venue, impact on the audience / profession, importance to the university, etc.

The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

Service to the university:

  • Provide faculty/staff development activities;
  • Serve as a mentor for junior faculty;
  • Serve as faculty representative to larger university community;
  • Actively participate in a manner which has a significant impact on the development of university’s academic programs, research culture, curriculum and/or program modification, assessment plans, learning or support services;
  • Sponsor or supervise student activities and/or student organizations; advise student groups;
  • Contribute to the development of the library (e.g., collection evaluation, recommendations)
  • Contribute to the development of other learning resources (e.g. Praxis or proficiency exam tutoring, etc.).
  • Assume leadership role on academic / campus committees;
  • Assume leadership role in faculty, college, or university governance structure, including General Faculty and/or policy development;
  • Serve on review boards and with accrediting agencies in a manner which has a significant impact;
  • Assume a leadership role in program review and accreditation self-study process;
  • Serve, in a significant manner, as university representative to the larger university community such as serving at the Regental system.

Service to the discipline:

  • Share professional expertise and/or materials with the discipline;
  • Provide consulting services (or serve as resource person) within the academic discipline / professional field;
  • Contribute, in a significant manner, to professional organization(s), agencies, corporations, or school districts or plan and implement activities for professional organizations, agencies, corporations or school districts;
  • Accept appointment in scholarly and/or leadership capacity to a state, regional, national or international position;
  • Provide educational services (or serve as resource person) within the academic discipline / professional field (i.e., edit professional journals);
  • Provide consulting services (or serve as resource person) within the academic discipline / professional field (i.e. review textbooks, for publishers, in one’s professional field);
  • Review or edit the scholarly or creative works of others;
  • Evaluate grant applications for outside agencies;
  • Provide consulting services to other universities, colleges, departments, or K-12 school districts;
  • Serve on review boards with accrediting agencies.

Service to the community:

  • Provide consulting services to organizations, agencies, corporations, or K-12 school districts;
  • Provide educational services to community organizations, agencies, corporations, or school districts;
  • Provide evaluation for community projects, activities, etc.;
  • Serve as the university’s representative to community organizations, agencies, corporations, or K-12 school districts.
  • Share professional expertise with the community or public, which results in significant recognition to the university or faculty member.
Citizenship
  • Assume a leadership role in civic activities that promote a positive relationship between the university and the community.

Librarianship

Library faculty members at DSU operate under two separate tracks. Until July 1, 2012, library faculty served on tenure or tenure track appointments with professorial ranks. As of that date, library faculty members are generally appointed to serve on term contracts with librarian ranks. Library faculty already holding tenure or tenure track appointments may continue to serve in these appointments with professorial ranks. For further information on library faculty tracks, refer to the current contract University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment.

Library faculty members are evaluated on their professional effectiveness in librarianship rather than, or in addition to, their teaching effectiveness and academic advising. Library faculty members holding professorial rank are expected to be active in the broad areas of librarianship; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service. Library faculty members holding librarian rank are expected to be active in librarianship.

This section of the standards serves as a guide for all library faculty members being evaluated in the area of librarianship, whether in professorial or librarian ranks, by providing examples of standards for performance in librarianship. Library faculty members with professorial rank will also be evaluated on scholarship and service areas covered in other sections of the standards document. The standards are a critical component of the annual faculty evaluation process and in promotion and/or tenure recommendations.

Library Faculty Standards of Performance

A library faculty member’s performance is assessed as Basic (Meets expectations), Basic (Exceeds expectations), High (Meets expectations), and High (Exceeds expectations). Performance standard expectations increase with rank.

Basic (Meets expectations) reflects the essential or indispensable level of performance for professional activity/workload assignments.

To move to Basic (Exceeds expectations), High (Meets expectations) and High (Exceeds expectations), library faculty must continue to meet expectations while moving beyond that level. There must be evidence of quality performance in addition to the breadth and intensity of participation in work activities and contributions to the profession. Documentation forms the basis for promotion and discretionary salary decisions.

To meet expectations in librarianship, all library faculty members must demonstrate professional performance in these aspects of librarianship:

  • Professional effectiveness – defined as the attributes and qualifications linked to the specific position held within the library;
  • Professional knowledge – defined as the command and knowledge of one’s specialty area and the ability to instruct in that area, as required,

Central to academic librarianship is the creation, communication, and provision of access to knowledge. DSU library faculty are expected to devote much of their time and energy in exercising their skills in support of the teaching curriculum and faculty research work, developing and preserving appropriate collections and services, and establishing effective bibliographic control over them. They are committed to assisting students to become scholars who can effectively find, critically evaluate, and appropriately use information.

Librarianship responsibilities reflect the nature of their role within the library. Library faculty whose main responsibilities lie in the cataloging and acquisitions areas of Technical Services are more focused on the acquisition and organization of knowledge while library faculty in the reference and instruction areas of Public Services are more focused on access and instruction. Both sides are of equal and central importance to the primary mission of the library.

It is the library faculty member’s responsibility to fully describe the impact, benefit, and effort expended in their librarianship activities as reflected by their specific position description. The following is a representative list of faculty responsibilities in the areas of librarianship. The list is not all-inclusive but serves as a guide for the annual performance evaluations and promotion and tenure evaluations of faculty librarians.
  • Identify, select, and acquire books, serials, and other resources necessary to support the teaching, research, and service activities of the university;
  • Classify and catalog books, serials, and other resources;
  • Provide reference services, including information desk service and telephone, email, and online services;
  • Provide interpretation of and instruction in the use of library and information resources, bibliographic tools, databases, and other organized guides to knowledge;
  • Develop, prepare, and provide instruction in and promotion of information literacy;
  • Provide access to, and maintain records for, information resources that support the teaching and research activities of faculty, staff, students, and others;
  • Analyze and develop methods of organizing bibliographic information and maintaining quality control;
  • Maintain and monitor the quality of library collections and services;
  • Collect, preserve, and provide access to archival materials;
  • Communicate and cooperate with faculty, staff, students, and others in the pursuit of better library services;
  • Analyze library needs, organize library materials, and design services to meet the present and future needs of the university community.

Librarianship – Basic Performance: The library faculty member must demonstrate and document all the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for Basic Performance in Librarianship:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of policies, procedures, goals, and resources of the library and the ability to work effectively within this framework;
  • Show professional conduct conducive to a collegial work environment and a standard of professional integrity that will advance the interest of DSU and the Karl E. Mundt Library;
  • Demonstrate competence in all skills and knowledge implied by the job requirements;
  • Collaborate with colleagues to improve library services, collections, instruction or learning.

To exceed expectations for Basic Performance in Librarianship, the faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors linked to librarianship. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Exhibit a commitment to maintaining (and increasing) the level of competence in librarianship;
  • Develop and use appropriate policies/procedures to meet library objectives;
  • Promote understanding and appreciation of diversity through collection development or instruction or other activities in librarianship;
  • Interpret and present technical information in a way learners (public, students, and other clientele) will understand;
  • Participate in university efforts to implement assessment and engage in self- assessment;
  • Contribute to program development and review processes;
  • Be available for consultation with students, faculty, and staff;
  • Analyze library needs and design services to meet the present and future needs of the university community;
  • Use technology appropriate to the discipline and needs of learners;
  • Integrate new knowledge obtained from professional conferences and literature;
  • Contribute to developing a global perspective by providing cultural information through exhibits, presentations, reference work, or instruction, OR by selecting relevant library resources, OR by providing access to relevant resources.
  • Contribute to the mission of the library and DSU by performing tasks beyond the scope of the normally assigned job responsibilities. (For example: Library faculty holding Librarian rank fulfilling service or research roles)

Librarianship – High Performance: High level of performance presumes that the professional behaviors included in Basic Performance are demonstrated and that performance moves beyond this level. As in Basic Performance, the quality or time commitment of involvement can be more important than the number of activities listed. Some activities in this list differ from Basic Performance activities only by inclusion of the relative term “significant”. In this context, “significant” should be interpreted as describing activities which are exceptional in terms of scope, prestige of venue, impact on the audience / profession, importance to the university, etc.

In addition to accomplishing the professional behaviors indicated above under Basic Performance, the library faculty member must demonstrate and document all the professional behaviors listed below to meet expectations for High Performance in Librarianship:

  • Demonstrate consistently competent performance, with evidence of activity beyond the minimum required for basic performance in assigned responsibilities;
  • Demonstrate mastery of all skills and knowledge implied by the job requirements;
  • Assist with the development of innovative services and/or work routines that enhance the library’s effectiveness;
  • Create opportunities to learn about the sources of information associated with disciplines or areas of study;
  • Collaborate with colleagues to improve or redesign library services, collections, programming, instruction or learning.

To exceed expectations for High Performance in Librarianship, the library faculty member must demonstrate and document additional professional behaviors linked to librarianship and their role within the Karl E. Mundt Library. The list included below is not intended to be all-inclusive; these are examples only:

  • Participate in significant professional development activities leading to enhanced skills and performance;
  • Be sought by and serve as a mentor to students, colleagues, and/or others;
  • Receive written or verbal testimonials of superior performance from library patrons and/or colleagues;
  • Provide leadership in the development of innovative services and/or work routines that enhance the library’s effectiveness;
  • Bring an excitement for the content and study of the discipline;
  • Conceive, explore, develop, implement, evaluate, and refine innovative methods, techniques, and materials;
  • Foster independent learning, creative thinking, exploration of ideas, and lifelong learning;
  • Contribute to improving the understanding of subject matter and methods of teaching and learning
  • Apply for and receive library related program and development grants in a competitive environment;
  • Receive professional recognition for recent or past honors, awards, or contributions;
  • Serve as organizer or moderator for a symposium or conference;
  • Receive recognition as an expert in one’s field;
  • Apply theories and techniques from faculty development activities
  • Contribute significantly to the mission of the library and DSU by performing tasks outside of assigned job responsibilities. (For example: Library faculty holding Librarian rank fulfilling service or research roles)

Annual Evaluation of Faculty Professional Performance

Faculty Holding Professorial Rank

The evaluation process for faculty is described in Section XII of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment. The document used to convey the information used in that evaluation is Appendix E in the Interim Terms. In general terms: on an annual basis, faculty members who hold professorial rank are evaluated by their immediate supervisor in the areas of teaching and advising; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service. At the beginning of the calendar year (or at the beginning of the academic year, for new faculty), the immediate supervisor and the faculty member establish expectations relative to these three evaluation areas and establish appropriate percentages for effort in each of the three areas. At the end of the calendar year, the faculty member’s immediate supervisor examines and evaluates the documentation provided by the faculty member relative to their performance in the three areas described above, and then assigns a numerical rating to the faculty member’s performance in each of the three evaluation areas.

The primary use of the annual evaluation document and the resulting performance ratings is to establish annual goals and expectations, to document progress in achieving goals, and to provide feedback on performance. This is intended to be a joint process between the faculty member and his/her immediate supervisor. The evaluation ratings are also used to support the university’s salary decisions. The current guidelines for salary decisions are specified in Section XIX of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment. And, finally, the evaluation ratings also have an impact on decisions relative to promotion and tenure recommendations.

The language in the sections on teaching and advising; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service in the preceding sections of this document consistently refer to “basic performance” and “high performance”. Basic Performance refers to the professional behaviors that reflect an essential or indispensable level of performance for teaching/advising; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service. High performance presumes that all the characteristics of basic performance have been accomplished and that the faculty member’s performance has moved beyond that level, in either a qualitative or quantitative sense.

Appropriate performance is an expectation for promotion, tenure and discretionary salary decisions.

Failure to Meet Expectations: While not defined in detail in this document, a rating of 0 (fails to meet expectations) indicates that the faculty member has not achieved the performance requirements for their rank in an evaluation area. These additional documents address performance expectations, performance deficiencies and/or unacceptable conduct by faculty:

  • BOR Policy 4:38 Statement Concerning Faculty Expectations
  • BOR Policy 4:42 Academic Misconduct

Professional Development Plans

With the implementation of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment, every tenured and tenure-track faculty member must have an approved Professional Development Plan (PDP). Section 12.2 Paragraph 3a. states “Faculty unit members serving on tenure track appointments will be responsible for proposing three-year plans for their own professional development in the areas of teaching, scholarship and service. Individualized professional development plans must address institutional standards for faculty performance, and they must be designed to permit individuals to progress towards the levels of high performance in all areas of professional activity and extramural recognition for ongoing scholarly accomplishment and leadership that would be expected of persons holding the rank of professor. If such plans necessitate equipment or resources not otherwise available at the university, the plans must indicate how the faculty unit member intends to secure funding for such resources. For additional details consult section 12.2 of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment. Most faculty members holding professorial rank have responsibilities in three areas: teaching and advising; research, scholarship, or creative activity; and service. But, because responsibilities vary, the professional development plan must be consistent with the expectations associated with the faculty member’s own position.

The professional development plan is intended to describe how the faculty member will organize his or her effort over a three- or six-year period in order to reach expected levels of achievement. The professional development plans for faculty members who are not tenured full professors should indicate a progressive increase in the quality and significance of planned accomplishments that, when fully and successfully implemented, will contribute toward promotion and/or tenure as described in this document. The plans for tenured full professors should indicate activities that will support their continued professional growth and leadership.

A faculty member’s professional development plan must address the standards for professional behavior provided in this document. In addition, the plans must be designed to encourage individuals to achieve:

  • appropriate levels of performance in all areas of professional activity (teaching, research, scholarship or creative activity, and service);
  • recognition for on-going scholarly accomplishment;
  • leadership levels that would be expected of persons holding the rank of tenured professor.

Standards for Professional Behavior Relative to Rank:
Minimum Requirements

Faculty Unit members holding Professorial Rank

The descriptions of Basic Performance and High Performance are directly linked to expectations for faculty members holding professorial rank at a particular academic rank and in a particular role within the university, as described below.

New Assistant Professor (0-2 years of service): Minimum requirements for contract renewal for new Assistant Professors include:

  • Basic Performance in teaching and advising or librarianship
  • Basic Performance in scholarship, research and creative activity
  • Meet Expectations in service to the university

Assistant Professor: Minimum requirements for Assistant Professors include:

  • High Performance in teaching and advising or librarianship*
  • Basic Performance in Research
  • Meets Expectations in Service

To earn tenure and be promoted to Associate Professor, an Assistant Professor must demonstrate performance in the areas of responsibility commensurate with the rank of associate professor (University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment Section XIII).

Associate Professor: Minimum requirements for Associate Professors include:

  • High Performance in teaching and advising or librarianship*, and
  • High Performance in research or exceeds expectations in Service
  • Meet Basic Performance expectations in remaining performance area

 To be promoted to Full Professor, an Associate Professor must demonstrate performance in the areas of responsibility commensurate with the rank of full professor (University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment Section XIII).

Full Professor: Minimum requirements for Full Professors include:

  • High Performance in teaching and advising or librarianship*
  • High Performance in research
  • Meets Expectations in service

 *For research faculty, research is expected to be the primary performance area, rather than teaching/advising.


Table 1: Minimum Performance Standards

Faculty RankPerformance StandardPerformance LanguagePerformance Rating
New Asst. Prof
(0-2 yrs of service)
     
Teaching/Advising* or Librarianship Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Second Performance Area Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Third Performance Area Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Asst. Prof.      
Teaching/Advising* or Librarianship High Performance Meets Expectations 1
Second Performance Area Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Third Performance Area Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Assoc. Prof.      
Teaching/Advising* or Librarianship High Performance Meets Expectations 1
Second Performance Area High Performance Meets Expectations 1
Third Performance Area Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Full Prof.      
Teaching/Advising* or Librarianship High Performance Meets Expectations 1
Research High Performance Meets Expectations 1
Service Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1

*For research faculty, research is expected to be the primary performance area, rather than Teaching/Advising.

Minimum Requirements for Promotion and Tenure
of Professorial Faculty

Minimum Promotion Eligibility Criteria: In addition to the minimum educational requirements for each academic rank, Section XIII of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment establishes the minimum eligibility criteria for promotion in rank. (Note: All references to years in rank refer to full-time academic year appointments.) As indicated in the minimum promotion eligibility criteria described below, faculty members must meet institutional performance standards for persons holding the rank sought in order to be awarded promotion to that rank.

Assistant Professor to Associate Professor: Six (6) years of successful post-doctoral or tenure-track college teaching or research experience in appropriate fields; evidence of external recognition for scholarly accomplishment; performance in the areas of responsibilities commensurate with the rank of Associate Professor; the award of tenure.

Note that, for a faculty member hired as an assistant professor in a tenure-track position, promotion to the rank of associate professor occurs upon the awarding of a tenure contract. To be eligible for tenure, assistant professors in tenure-track contracts must meet the minimum tenure eligibility criteria for tenure described in the section below as well as the minimum eligibility criteria for associate professor listed above.

Associate Professor to Full Professor: Five (5) years in rank in the institution; tenure;ten (10) years of successful post-doctoral or tenure-track college teaching or research experience in appropriate fields; evidence of external recognition for ongoing scholarly accomplishment andleadership; performance in the areas of responsibilities commensurate with the rank of Full Professor.

A faculty member must provide some evidence of discipline-specific scholarly publications or creative works in significant venues to be promoted to full professor. Research in teaching and learning alone is not sufficient for promotion to full professor unless the faculty member’s discipline is education or the faculty member teaches instructional methods courses in his/her discipline. However, faculty members can include research in teaching and learning as part of their research portfolio.

Minimum Tenure Eligibility Criteria: The University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment’s Section XIV establishes minimum criteria for granting tenure. The institution’s recommendation for tenure is based on an assessment of the candidate’s past contributions and promise of future contributions to the goals and mission of the institution. To be granted the privileges of tenure, faculty members must:

  • Demonstrate that they have developed, maintained and implemented well-defined professional development plans in the areas of teaching, scholarship and service;
  • Demonstrate that they currently meet institutional performance standards in teaching and advising or librarianship; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service for Associate Professors and that they shall, in due course, meet institutional performance standards in teaching and advising; scholarship, research and creative activity; and service for Full Professors.

Faculty unit members holding the rank of assistant professor or higher may apply for tenure during their sixth year of tenure-track service. Tenure-track service is based on full-time academic appointments or their equivalents. Part-time appointments may be recognized on a pro-rata basis. For those who were hired at the rank of assistant professor on tenure-track contracts, promotion to the rank of associate professor occurs upon the awarding of a tenure contract. To be eligible for tenure, assistant professors in tenure-track contracts must meet the requirements for tenure described above as well as the minimum requirements for associate professor listed in the previous section.


Minimum Requirements for Change in Rank
for Lecturer Faculty

The rank qualifications which are set forth below are minimums for employment as established by the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment. All references to teaching experience in rank qualifications listed below are to full-time academic year appointments or to their equivalents. Where part-time experience is to be recognized, it will be recognized on a pro-rata basis.

Instructor: Earned master's degree; or other degrees or qualifications recognized under academic program or discipline accreditation standards.

Lecturer: Earned doctorate or a postgraduate degree, other than a doctorate, recognized by the Board as a permitted terminal degree for the faculty unit members' discipline at the institution.

Senior Lecturer: Earned doctorate or a postgraduate degree, other than a doctorate, recognized by the Board as a permitted terminal degree for the faculty unit members' discipline at the institution and six (6) years of successful teaching at the university level.

Minimum Performance Standards for Lecturer Rank: Faculty members with lecturer rank are expected to meet the performance standards for Teaching and Advising outlined in detail earlier in this document.

Table 2: Minimum Performance Standards -- Lecturer Ranks

Faculty Rank

Performance Standard

Performance Language

Performance Rating

0-2 years of service      
Teaching/Advising Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
2+ years of service      
Teaching/Advising High Performance Meets Expectations 1

Procedures to Request a Change in Rank

Minimum Requirements for Change in Rank for Lecturer Faculty: The procedures described below are intended to assist faculty on term contracts with lecturer rank who feel that they have met minimum qualifications for the next highest academic rank and reflect the terms established in the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment. As indicated below, faculty members must meet institutional performance standards for persons holding the rank sought in order to move to that rank.

All references to years in rank herein are to full-time academic year appointments or to their equivalents. Faculty unit members become eligible to apply for change in rank during the year in which their length of service will meet the stated requirements. The Board of Regents may, at its discretion and upon the recommendation of the administration of the institution, reduce the number of years of service required for eligibility for change in rank; provided that prior service credit may not be requested in conjunction with an application for change in rank.

The faculty member’s dean reviews the request and submits a recommendation to the Dean’s Council prior to October 5, for review and recommendation to the president. The change in academic rank becomes effective if/when another term contract is offered.

In addition to the minimum rank qualifications for employment, the minimum eligibility criteria for change in rank will be:

Instructor to Lecturer: This change in rank is dependent on a recommendation from the faculty member’s dean. The faculty member is not expected or required to provide any documentation, other than a formal statement to the dean, indicating he/she meets the minimum qualifications for Lecturer: earned doctorate or a postgraduate degree, other than a doctorate, recognized by the DSU as a permitted terminal degree for the faculty unit members' discipline; three (3) years in rank as an Instructor at the institution; and performance in the areas of responsibilities commensurate with the rank of Lecturer.

Lecturer to Senior Lecturer: This change in rank is dependent on a recommendation from the Dean. The faculty member is not expected or required to provide any documentation, other than a formal statement to the Dean, indicating he/she meets the minimum qualifications for Senior Lecturer: earned doctorate or a postgraduate degree, other than a doctorate, recognized by the DSU as a permitted terminal degree for the faculty unit members' discipline; five (5) years in rank as Lecturer at the institution; and performance in the areas of responsibilities commensurate with the rank of Senior Lecturer.


Minimum Requirements for Change in Rank of Library Faculty

Library Faculty Holding Professorial Rank

Library faculty members holding professorial rank are expected to be active in the broad areas of librarianship; scholarship, research, and creative activity; and service.

Library faculty unit members serving under tenure-track or tenure appointments will review their progress for the year towards meeting the objectives set out in their professional development plans. Based on this information, the library faculty unit member will complete a self-evaluation on a form prepared by the administration.

For library faculty members holding professorial rank, the evaluation form and any attached comments and materials will be presented to the department head by the end of the January 15, or the first working day thereafter, of each year. The evaluative period covered will be the previous calendar year.

The evaluation process for library faculty holding professorial rank is described in Section 12.3 of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment. Library faculty holding professorial rank will be evaluated under institutional standards implementing Board Policy 4:38 for professorial ranks.

Library Faculty holding Librarian Rank

Library faculty members holding librarian rank are expected to be active in librarianship. The annual evaluation will be based on written individual performance goals developed by each library faculty unit member holding librarian rank and approved, or modified and approved, by the administration. Goals will be revised and restated during the annual evaluation process.

Library faculty unit members will document their accomplishments for the academic year and assess their efforts to achieve their approved goals. These accomplishments and the library faculty unit member self-assessment will be recorded on a form prepared by the administration and submitted to the Library Director by March 15 or the first working day thereafter, of each year. The evaluative period covered will be the previous academic year as well as the prior March, April, and May.

The evaluation process for library faculty holding librarian rank is described in Section 12.3 of the University Faculty Interim Terms and Conditions of Employment.

Library Faculty with Librarian Rank Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation for librarian ranks will focus upon progress towards accomplishing agreed upon performance goals focused upon results obtained rather than tasks undertaken. Without precluding consideration of other, material matters, six criteria will be considered in evaluating the job performance and goal attainment of each library faculty member:

  • Job knowledge, skills, and overall performance
  • Customer service
  • Teamwork and interpersonal relations
  • Initiative and creativity
  • Supporting and furthering the mission of the library and institution
  • Supervisory or managerial skills (when applicable)

Standards for Professional Behavior Relative to Library Faculty Holding Librarian Rank: Minimum Requirements

The descriptions of Basic Performance and High Performance are directly linked to expectations for library faculty members holding librarian rank at a particular academic rank and in a particular role within the university, as described below.

Assistant Librarian: Minimum requirements for contract renewal for Assistant Librarians include:

  • Basic Performance in librarianship

Associate Librarian: Minimum requirements for contract renewal for Associate Librarians include:

  • Basic – Exceeds Performance in librarianship

Full Librarian: Minimum requirements for contract renewal for Full Librarian include:

  • High Performance in librarianship

 

Table 3: Minimum Performance Standards for Library Faculty holding Librarian Rank

The following table refers to Library Faculty holding Librarian Rank. Library Faculty holding Professorial Rank must follow the minimum performance standards in Table 1.

Faculty Rank

Performance Standard

Performance Language

Performance Rating

Asst. Librarian      
Librarianship Basic Performance Meets Expectations 1
Assoc. Librarian      
Librarianship Basic-Exceeds Performance Meets Expectations 1
Full Librarian      
Librarianship High Performance Meets Expectations 1

 

Minimum Requirements for Change in Rank
of Library Faculty holding Librarian Rank

The procedures described below are intended to assist library faculty holding librarian rank on term contracts who feel that they have met minimum qualifications for the next highest academic rank. As indicated below, library faculty members must meet institutional performance standards for persons holding the rank sought in order to move to that rank.

All references to years in rank herein are to full-time, twelve-month appointments or to their equivalents. Faculty unit members become eligible to apply for change in rank during the year in which their length of service will meet the stated requirements. The Board may, at its discretion and upon the recommendation of the administration of the institution, reduce the number of years of service required for eligibility for change in rank; provided that prior service credit may not be requested in conjunction with an application for change in rank.

The Library Director reviews the request and submits a recommendation to the Dean’s Council prior to November 5, for review and recommendation to the president. The change in academic rank becomes effective if/when another term contract is offered.

Assistant Librarian to Associate Librarian: This change in rank is dependent on a recommendation from the Library Director. The library faculty member will submit a written application to the Library Director by October 5, indicating he/she meets the minimum qualifications for associate librarian: master’s degree in library or information science; additional master, specialist, or doctoral degree; and 10 years of experience as a professional librarian OR 5 years in rank as an Assistant Librarian at the institution; and performance in the areas of responsibilities commensurate with the rank of Associate Librarian. The application will include documentation to establish performance commensurate with the award of the librarian rank sought.

Associate Librarian to Full Librarian: This change in rank is dependent on a recommendation from the Library Director. The library faculty member will submit a written application to the Library Director by October 5, indicating he/she meets the minimum qualifications for full Librarian: master’s degree in library or information science; additional master, specialist, or doctoral degree; and 15 years of experience as a professional librarian OR 5 years in rank as an Associate Librarian at the institution; and performance in the areas of responsibilities commensurate with the rank of full Librarian. The application will include documentation to establish performance commensurate with the award of the librarian rank sought.

 

Summary

The broad definitions and professional behaviors described in this document are representative of the breadth of activities that may be appropriate for faculty members, depending on their individual roles, rank, and assignments. Some of the professional behaviors included in the earlier sections of this document appear on more than one list or in more than one category. Because of role differences, activities that may represent research for one faculty member may more accurately describe professional behavior in service for another. It is important to remember that where the activity is placed is dependent upon the individual faculty member’s role, rank, assignment and discipline.

This document restates the mission of the university as approved by the South Dakota Board of Regents. It clarifies the primary roles of faculty and reiterates the expectation that all faculty members are responsible for providing significant professional achievement in teaching and advising; scholarship, research and creative activity; and in service. The intent is that this document be used in the spirit in which it is offered, as a guide for faculty in providing the documentation required on an annual basis for performance appraisals and on a periodic basis for promotion and tenure decisions. It should also be used to help the faculty member and his/her immediate supervisor set goals and priorities for professional development, identify areas of strength and opportunities for growth, and highlight accomplishments within the parameters of the University's mission. This process should follow these principles:

  • Faculty roles can vary between colleges and disciplines. However, every faculty member has an assigned role that reflects the university’s mission and is linked to specific assignments in teaching/advising, scholarship/research/creative activity and service.
  • Professional behaviors are statements of the university’s expectations for faculty members relative to their assigned roles. In some categories, the document indicates that the faculty member must achieve all of the professional behaviors listed. In other categories, the list of professional behaviors is not all inclusive but is intended to provide examples.
  • The professional behaviors used to document professional achievement in each of the three evaluation areas are expected to reflect the faculty member’s role within the university.
  • The standards set for professional behaviors are a function of the faculty member’s rank and are specifically highlighted above.
  • The faculty member is responsible for providing the documentation that is used to determine the extent to which any particular professional behavior is met.
  • Evaluation of faculty member performance is directly related to achievement of the professional behaviors included in this document. The evaluation that is provided by the faculty member’s immediate supervisor is an appraisal of how well the individual faculty member has achieved the professional behaviors highlighted in their Appendix F documentation.
  • Evaluation of professional behaviors is accomplished to determine promotion, tenure, contract continuation, and/or salary allocation.

Attachment A:
DSU Mission Statement

From Board of Regents Policy 1:10:5

The Legislature established Dakota State University as an institution specializing in programs in computer management, computer information systems, and other related undergraduate and graduate programs as outlined in SDCL § 13-59-2.2. A special emphasis is the preparation of the elementary and secondary teachers with expertise in the use of computer technology and information processing in the teaching and learning process.

The Board implemented SDCL § 13-59-2.2 by authorizing undergraduate and graduate programs that are technology-infused and promote excellence in teaching and learning. These programs support research, scholarly and creative activities and provide service to the State of South Dakota and the region. Dakota State University is a member of the South Dakota System of Higher Education.


Curriculum: Degrees are authorized at the associate, baccalaureate, master's and doctoral levels.

The following curriculum is approved for the university:

  1. Undergraduate Programs:
    • Associate degree programs are approved in allied health care, business, general studies, and information technology.
    • Baccalaureate programs are approved in allied health care, business, education, information technology, mathematics, and sciences.
  2. Graduate Programs:
    • Masters degree programs are approved in education and information technology. A Doctor of Science degree in Information Systems is approved.

Attachment B:
Documentation for Promotion and Tenure

Minimum Documentation

It is the applicant's responsibility to submit documentation that substantiates his/her qualification for promotion/tenure per the guidelines outlined within the policy. Only those activities and materials that date from the faculty member's last promotion should be included in the documentation.  This documentation should provide evidence of the applicant's expertise and accomplishment in each of these areas:

  • Teaching and advising or librarianship
  • Scholarship/Research/Creative Work
  • Service to the University, Discipline/Profession, Community or Public

The documentation should also include:

  • Personal statement of application for promotion or tenure, including a statement documenting that minimum promotion and tenure eligibility criteria (as described in the Board of Regents (BOR) Policy and the BOR-COHE Agreement) have been met;
  • Personal statement on philosophy of teaching;
  • At least three letters of recommendation from colleagues (at least one must be from a professional colleague of the applicant's academic unit and at least one from a professional colleague from off-campus). These recommendations should address their knowledge of the candidate's accomplishments in the areas of teaching, scholarship/research/creative works, and/or service;
  • Current curriculum vita;
  • Copies of published works: articles, papers, manuscripts, books, evaluation instruments or software, photos, slides or recordings of any creative works.
  • Names and contact information for current and former students who can be contacted by the Promotion and Tenure Committee for feedback on the faculty member's accomplishments relative to the evaluative criteria for teaching.

The faculty's official personnel file will be available to the Promotion and Tenure Committee.

Recognition of Other Activities

As provided in the BOR-COHE Agreement, faculty unit members and their supervisors may agree that other specific activities shall be considered teaching/advising; research, scholarship and creative activity; or service contributions. Significant performance relative to these other activities will also be recognized, provided that such specified activities are consistent with the policy goals stated in Appendix G of the COHE agreement and the professional behaviors listed above in this standards document.

To warrant recognition, other specific activities must be justified in terms of the mission of the university, the role or mission of the faculty unit member's department or discipline or the faculty unit member's specific assignment as agreed to by the faculty unit member and his/her immediate supervisor. This agreement to recognize other activities is intended to permit the modification of performance standards for individual unit faculty members, as warranted by unique circumstances.

Documentation to Demonstrate Accomplishments

The applicant should present representative evidence of accomplishments, even if some seem appropriate for promotion to a higher rank than that for which they are applying. Documentation refers to the specific materials that can be used to substantiate or illustrate a faculty member's achievement of a particular professional behavior. In general, faculty members aren't expected to provide physical documentation to substantiate the professional behaviors listed on an annual Appendix F document. However, appropriate (but not exhaustive) documentation is a necessary component in a faculty member's application for promotion or tenure. Examples of appropriate documentation are included below.

Documenting Professional Behavior in Teaching

Faculty members are responsible for explaining and documenting the impact (to themselves, to students, to their college, to the institution) of behaviors. The following are some examples of documentation which may be used in determining the impact of a behavior. The list is not meant to be all-inclusive.

  • Description of how course, administrator, peer, or self evaluation results (and other applicable quantitative and qualitative data) were used to improve the course or improve teaching and the outcome;
  • Description/documentation of attendance at faculty development sessions, seminars, workshops, courses, conferences, etc., along with an explanation of how the faculty member applied knowledge from these activities to their teaching;
  • Explanations of where and when presentations or training (related to pedagogy and teaching/learning) were done or publications were achieved;
  • Examples of good teaching (lesson plans, activities, assignment criteria sheets, rubrics, etc.);
  • Descriptions of changes in course syllabi assignments and projects and the significance of those changes;
  • Descriptions of new technologies and software utilized or developed to enhance teaching and learning;
  • Evidence of student learning (grades, pre/post tests, projects, comments from teaching evaluation documents, etc);
  • Evidence of broadened student learning (students present material related to your class at conference or workshop; student publications);
  • Explanations of mentoring relationships and the importance, outcome, and/or impact;
  • Description of individualized instruction or help session, materials and methods used, and problem areas addressed;
  • Explanations of the faculty member's role in curriculum and assessment activities.

Documenting Professional Behavior in Advising

Faculty members are responsible for explaining and documenting the impact (to themselves, to students, to their college, to the institution) of behaviors. The following are some examples of documentation that may be used in determining the impact of a behavior. The list is not meant to be all-inclusive.

  • Evaluations by program coordinator and/or dean, self evaluations, and student evaluations;
  • Student files with documentation of advising activities;
  • Explanation of when and how advisees and/or other students were assisted, including student orientation and registration sessions;
  • Participation in workshops or seminars designed to improve academic advising skills;
  • Description of when and where innovative advising techniques were disseminated to colleagues;
  • Explanation of when and how technology was used and its impact on advising;
  • Description of the assessment techniques or materials used and the outcome;
  • Description of the faculty member's role in project/dissertation or portfolio review.

Documenting Professional Behavior in Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity

As indicated above, copies of published works (articles, papers, manuscripts, books, evaluation instruments or software, grant applications and awards, photos, slides or recordings of any creative works) must be included as part of the faculty member's research portfolio. Faculty members are responsible for explaining and documenting the impact of behaviors to themselves, to students, to their college, to the discipline, and to the institution. The following are some examples of documentation which may be used in determining the impact of a behavior. The list is not meant to be all-inclusive.

  • Evaluation by professional peers;
  • Awards, prizes, commendations, honors, invited presentations;
  • Development of software, media, patents, inventions;
  • Citation counts;
  • Advanced degrees, certifications, etc.

Documenting Professional Behavior in Service

Faculty members are responsible for explaining and documenting the impact of behaviors to themselves, to students, to their college, to the discipline, and to the institution. The following are some examples of documentation which may be used in determining the impact of a behavior. The list is not meant to be all-inclusive.

  • Evaluations or ratings by program coordinator and/or dean;
  • Evaluations or ratings by committee members, committee chair, or supervisor of an activity;
  • Evaluations by an organization to which service was provided;
  • Evaluations by professional peers;
  • Citations or acknowledgements of contributions;
  • News articles, announcements, feature stories, photo stories, web sites;
  • Discussion of role in the activities of university, college, or multi-institutional committees and task forces;
  • Reports produced for institutional or departmental studies or projects;
  • Recruitment seminars and recruitment efforts;
  • Discussion of role in student activities;
  • Description / documentation of function and/or position in professional organizations;
  • Discussion of role in activities of city, county, state, or regional committees;
  • Description of efforts to promote the mission and interests of DSU;
  • Description of service to schools and other universities;
  • Description of editorial and advisory service to professional journals or review boards;
  • Description of advisory services to accrediting agencies;
  • Description of efforts to share knowledge related to application and promotion of technology;
  • Evidence of collaboration with colleagues in other disciplines.

 


Last Updated: 5/24/13